History Of Fashion Acient Greek Fashion Accessories

History Of Fashion Acient Greek Fashion Accessories

Jewelry Ancient Greeks had an affinity for earrings, bracelets, necklaces, brooches, and rings, made of metal and semiprecious stones. More »

Cycle of Fashion Trend

Cycle of Fashion Trend

It’s a fashionista’s worst experience, even worse than looking oversize buddy, more degrading than wearing the same dress in another party — it’s the fear of symbolizing looking yesteryear fashion trend model. More »

Banglads Mens Online Fashion Store

Banglads Mens Online Fashion Store

As the title suggest, the Banglads is truly a site for men. Since longing for beauty is no longer the special right of women, more and more males are paying attention to their appearance. More »

Fashion Tips For Apple Shaped Women

Fashion Tips For Apple Shaped Women

If you have a thick waist and small hips, then you have an apple shaped body. Don’t envy the pear shaped girls and hourglass figures. More »

Burlesque Costumes – A Brief History

Burlesque Costumes – A Brief History

Suddenly burlesque and pinup fashions are all over the Internet. The original burlesque designs with their risqu overtones have become the fun fashion, being adapted and adopted by rockabilly. More »

 

How’s to be A Fashion Designer

cc4499.info1It appears like everyone seems to be jumping on the designer bandwagon recently. And why not? the style business is attractive – fashion shows, parties, celebrities, recognition, and even fame go together with a career in fashion.

Now herein lies the question: does one visit style college or go straight to beginning a business? Not all fashion designers go the standard route to style college, instead drawing on associate degree entrepreneurial spirit, some “designers” flip their head for business into a thriving fashion enterprise.

Ralph Lauren is associate degree example of a tailor United Nations agency bypassed the stitching machine and headed straight for the marketplace. that path you are taking depends on your personal motivation. If you like stitching and pattern creating, the standard route goes to bring the foremost satisfaction. If you like the style world however do not have the patience for needle and thread, a career within the fast and exciting fashion occupation remains doable … read on.

So you would like to travel out on your own, what is first?

You’ve continuously loved fashion designers and their ability to style stylish, distinctive and wearable fashions season when season, as if by magic. however it is not magic; it is a business. And to reach business, no one is associate degree island (meaning that everybody wants to a small degree facilitate to accomplish his or her dreams). And it is not all tawdriness and glamour. Being a tailor suggests that you’ve got to truly run a business.

Before you print up those business cards, raise yourself if you are ready to roll up your sleeves and tackle the not-so fun aspects of fashion.

At first, running a industry might mean fulfilling orders yourself (i.e., packing boxes till the wee hours of the morning), steaming garments repeatedly throughout fashion shows, and accounting. you’ll pay solely atiny low share of some time truly designing; instead you are networking, schmoozing and negotiating with suppliers and vendors.

If you are aiming to take the direct-to-consumer path, you’ll need to make a web site and maintain it (and presumably have to be compelled to pay somebody to handle these tasks), get a businessperson account to method mastercard transactions and manage charge back cycles. If you are not fascinated by learning what this stuff mean, then you’ll attempt to work for an oversized fashion house to be told the ropes.

But if you’ve got the endurance and enough friends with skills or services you’ll trade for, you’ll leave on your own and succeed. these days is that the age of entrepreneurship, why should not you get a chunk of the pie?

The fashion biz: a reality check

Exciting industries are rife with competition-some that will fade away and others that will give you a run for your money. You have to compete against the big names out there and trendy emerging designers fresh out of the best design schools or veterans of big fashion houses-not to mention all the celebrities popping up with their own labels.

Running your own fashion biz may require you to reach out to suppliers and potential customers all over the world, which means you better be organized. Are you prepared to coordinate the procurement of raw materials like fabric, trim and hardware, so that your manufacturer gets what they need at the right time to deliver a finished product on deadline?

Think of yourself as a business person first and a fashion designer second. If your fashion business fails, you’re the one that suffers. Always keep the business aspect in the forefront of your mind. Some people find this prospect exhilarating, while others can’t think of anything more horrifying. Still interested in starting your own fashion business?

I’m not a designer, can I still work in the fashion industry?

Yes … and no. If you have the design vision, you can pay people to take your idea and turn it into a tangible pattern or design. This is sort of like what a creative director does. If this fits your situation, then you’d better have the business chops to get your business off the ground and you’d better have a solid Core Value Proposition.

What this means is that you must have a strong business proposal and offer a product that’s valuable and in demand. That doesn’t mean you have to sell high-end couture clothing to rich people. Clothiers H&M and Zara focus on fast ready-to-wear fashion at affordable pricepoints.

There is more than one path to becoming a fashion designer. You can learn to sew and go to design school to learn the ins-and-outs of the business. But not everyone learns to draw patterns and stitch together garments. The keys to succeeding in the fashion business are creativity, a good business sense and determination.

Stay tuned for more advice on becoming a fashion designer.

The Significance Of Mens Fashion Clothes

cc4499.info2Earlier, it was considered that fashion and style were there, only for women. However, people fail to understand that men can also wear fashionable and stylish clothes. Those days had gone when men were not bothered about their style and fashion. So, there is no need to mention that designer menswear can be very durable, unique and stylish one also.

Nowadays, men are also very conscious of what they wear (in terms of clothes) or how they look (in terms of physical appearance). Unfortunately in modern time, people tend to pass a quick sarcasm based on the physical appearance. Hence, clothes play a vital role in making any judgment.

Over the several years, many studies have proven that the clothes have a major impact on any individual’s overall personality. Clothes have the vital role in affecting that how other people will judge, distinguish and interact with another person on the basis of his dressing sense.

Clothes are also helpful in making or maintaining any status in the society. You can also call them status symbol. They have an effect on others that how they think of you. If you want people to praise, respect and regard you highly than the designer or stylish cloths can do this job very effectively.

Fashionable or designer clothes are responsible, if you want to look good, unique, trendy or stylish. They are also helpful for you to become a trendsetter. In another sense, never forget that these are not just clothes; instead it is a pleasure or happiness and confidence that you can wear.

There are many accessories also that you can wear to dress properly in order to look good and smart at every event and situation. In the list of various accessories and items, there are some things that every man should have in his wardrobe such as belt etc. Those things are also known as “wardrobe essentials” or “wardrobe stables”. Always aim to buy a high quality clothes only that may fit your physique. And also, select the colors that enhance your personality.

So, you can look for the designer clothes at various stores and shops and also mens fashion clothing online search is now becoming a trend as there are a lot of websites that offers fashionable, designer and stylish menswear. Following are the list of some clothes that a man can wear:

•    Casual shirts
•    Chinos (Pants or Trousers)
•    Coats
•    Dress shirts
•    Formal Shoes
•    Jeans
•    Outer Wears
•    Shorts
•    Suits
•    Sweaters
•    T-Shirts
•    Accessories
•    Belts
•    Cufflinks
•    Ties
•    Vests
•    Winter Scarves/Mittens

So, if you wish to look good and confident then you can shop for the latest trends. And there is one important thing that you need to keep in mind while you go out for shopping that do not to go after what other people wear, instead select the one that improves your personality and provide you the complete comfort level as there are many varieties in every section.

History Of Fashion Acient Greek Fashion Accessories

Greek Fashion

This is the second part of the article on ancient Greek dress

Jewelry
Ancient Greeks had an affinity for earrings, bracelets, necklaces, brooches, and rings, made of metal and semiprecious stones. Precious metals were also used, but gold became popular only in the 6th century BC.

Jewelry evolved over time. During the Archaic period, jewelry pieces were simple and mainly functional. Such were the pins or brooches used to fasten the himation or the chiton, or the seal rings used to seal letters and important documents. By Hellenistic times goldsmiths had mastered their craft and jewelry featured an exquisite design and composition.

Footwear
The sandals were the common footwear for both men and women. The Greek sandal featured several straps, which stretched between the toes to the ankle in various fashions. They were minimal, light, and left the foot almost bare. Although high heels are considered to be a 16thcentury invention, already in ancient Greece women tried to make themselves taller by attaching cork sole to the leather sole. For travel or warfare, men wore fitted shoes – ankle-high or mid-calf length -and boots that either laced up or stayed on the foot with the help of a criss-cross thong at the toe.

Hats and head-dresses
Headgear came in different shapes and styles. There were several variations of a cone-shaped hat. The bonnet was another known style. The pilos was a brimless skull cap made from felt or wool. Women wore scarves, wrapped around the head. The saccus featured a tassel at the back as well as nets or snoods to hold the hair back. The petasos was made of woven straw. It featured a brim that could be turned up or down, and could also be fastened at the neck by a ribbon.

Hair styles
Hair styles for men and women were initially similar. In the early ages men wore their hair fussy with curls forming a crown around the forehead or braids wound around the head. But styles eventually were simplified and long hair became acceptable only for the elderly male, young men or boys.

Hair styles were known by names: the kepos was unkempt, the Hectorean style involved cutting and combing the hair backward into curls, and the Theseid featured strands of hair worn short at the forehead while the rest hung down longer at the back of the neck.

Young girls let their hair fall freely. Older women wore their hair long and let it fall loose over the shoulders. They could also wear their hair parted in the middle, waved, and scraped back so as to expose the ears. Sometimes, three or four strands, or spiral curls, were sectioned from the rest of the hair and styled so they hung down over the forehead while the rest of the hair hung down loosely at the back. Bands, ribbons, diadems, or strings of pearls added sophistication to hairdos.

Beauty and grooming
Make-up was used by most women. It consisted in applying a white base color to the face, rouge to the cheekbones, and painting one’s lips. The base color was often made of lead, which could have fatal consequences, while the rouge was made from vermilion or vegetables. Women would also use eye make-up, which involved Egyptian kohl and shadows in different colors. Eyebrows were groomed and, painted black.

Perfumes were very popular, especially the essences of violet, mint, myrrh, marjoram, and thyme. The Greeks often applied different scents to different body areas.

Women conditioned their skin on a daily basis, used depilatories to remove body hair, and used different concoctions on both their face and body.

Good physical shape was important for both sexes, although only men were allowed in the palestra – a complex devoted to exercise.

Banglads Mens Online Fashion Store

Men Shoes

As the title suggest, the Banglads is truly a site for men. Since longing for beauty is no longer the special right of women, more and more males are paying attention to their appearance. Then no matter clothing, skincare, body care or hair care needs, men start to spend a lot of time and money to keep healthy and fashionable. Here now, we will recommend Banglads as your first choice when you are searching for underwear online.

Something About Banglads

June 2006 end the Banglads baby was born. Its founder Mat started the ball rolling when he finished his last design contract in the Spring of 06. Banglads started small, Mat, his cat and some helpful cheap friends, but the site soon picked up speed as news spread and many customers began to return over and over and over again to the site. So much so that only a year after they were already redeveloping the website and had moved to larger offices.

In May 2009 the Banglads website has just undergone a major upgrade and redevelopment so that it can continue to keep up with what the customers want. Plus they have also just expanded the warehouse space to accommodate all the new lines they have.

And without sounding hopelessly cheesy, Banglads provide a fashion packed selection of mens designer underwear with affordable prices. As a consumer, I think the reason why there are so many returned customers in Banglads is that this online store offer the best value, fast shipping, easy returns and most importantly its customer service team really do listen to you.

Shopping by Categories & Brands

The easiest way to look for products is to find what you really want. For instance, if you need a swim suit, you can immediately head to the page of swimwear where all the products are listed, thanks to the clear categories. In order to save time or find the right products, youd better check the categories on the homepage of this site. It includes Mens Boxers, Mens Briefs, Mens Jocks, Mens Tanks, Mens Swimwear, Enhancing Underwear, Mens Sportswear, Swimming & Contouring Underwear, Daring Underwear, Sports Shorts, Sweats, Sports Tops, Tees & Tanks, Loungewear. In addition, if you are brand lovers, you can directly browse the brands listed in this site. The most popular brands in Banglads are 2(x)-ist, Andrew Christian, Calvin Klein, N2N, Diesel, Ed Hardy and so on. With so many brand products available, I am sure you will find your favorite style.

Enjoy the Latest Promotions or Special Offers

The majority of the homepage plays host to a variety of promotions and offers, so if youre looking for a bargain, you simply pick and choose the one that works for you. There are three options for you, 20% off sale, 30% off sale and 50% off sale. Whats more, Banglads provides catalogues where you can find a Banglads offer code for certain promos. There are also money off vouchers for Banglads and Banglads UK discount codes available at www.voucherpark.co.uk .

In short, Banglads is a great place to shop online, especially for men who just do not want to spend much time to leave the house to shop. Through the Banglads website, shopping is made easier and more convenient.

Fashion Tips For Apple Shaped Women

Apple Women

If you have a thick waist and small hips, then you have an apple shaped body. Don’t envy the pear shaped girls and hourglass figures. You too can look shapely and womanly if you dress to flatter your figure and Fall 2008 through Winter 2009 fashion has plenty of outfits made just for you.

First of all, unlike a pear shaped girl or hourglass figure, an apple girl’s waist isn’t the narrowest part of her torso. That award goes to her ribcage. So treat the narrowest part of your ribcase as your waist, and suddenly, you’ve got curves too.

By bringing the waistline of your dresses and tops to your rib cage, the effect seen in empire waist clothes, you get a shapely figure. So focus on empire waist dresses and blouses. They flatter you.

Now for Fall and Winter 2008, dresses are hot and they skim the natural waist. Many of them have empire waists. The lace black dress with long sleeves is in. As is the pretty flowy top with big sleeves. So girl, this is your season.

1. Start with a new dress. Prints or plain. Colored or neutral. It doesn’t matter, other than the fact that it has a high waistline and is in a color or colors that flatter you.

2. Detract from you thick waist by drawing the eye to your arms and legs. You blouse should have full sleeves. The hems of the sleeves should be full and flowy. A longish blouse or top that has an empire waist, but flares below to a full hemline is another plus for you. Pick one such blouse, sheer, or lacy or made of a velvet or silk. Either way, if it is flowy and full in the right places, you’ll look more feminine in it.

3. Get one of the black lace dresses that are so hot this season. Pick one with full sleeves, with wide hemlines at the end of each sleeve. Get it in floaty lace, with an empire waist of course. A full hemline for the skirt wouldn’t hurt either. Make that your de facto little black dress.

4. Load up on the accessories. Wear earrings to draw attention to your pretty face. Wear bangles to bring the eye to your arms instead of your waist. Wear stunning shoes, or boots that would complete your look.

5. Get on of this season’s pretty belts and use that to cinch your dresses and jackets at the narrowest part of your ribcage.

Burlesque Costumes – A Brief History

Suddenly burlesque and pinup fashions are all over the Internet. The original burlesque designs with their risqu overtones have become the fun fashion, being adapted and adopted by rockabilly. Almost every city now hosts regular burlesque events where not just the performers, but the audience gets to dress the part as well.

Origins of burlesque – lingerie on show!

The word burlesque probably derives from the French, which describes a piece of slightly outrageous, humorous art. The term burlesque originally applied to shows intended for middle or lower classes. Such shows lampooned upper class niceties and parodying upper class entertainments like opera & dance. Such music and comedy shows and plays grew in popularity on both sides of the Atlantic during the nineteenth century. In Victorian England, where even “a glimpse of stocking was looked on as something shocking”, burlesque challenged its audience by offering rather more than a “glimpse of stocking” – the lure of young ladies appearing in tights and lingerie! Certainly demure by today’s standards these slightly suggestive interludes certainly boosted the popularity of burlesque. Lydia Thompson took a burlesque troupe, called the British Blondes to New York near the end of the 1860s where they were an immediate hit. At first they were feted by the press, but before long strident voices, from the pulpit and the papers were complaining of loose morals and indecency. The result of all this adverse publicity was to spread the word about burlesque far and wide in America effectively having the reverse effect to that desired by burlesque’s critics – female burlesque troupes with close copies of the original British act sprung up around the country.

These shows owed a great deal of their structure to the minstrel shows of the time and generally consisted of three parts – the initial section featuring the ladies, the middle section was a mix of male comedians and specialty acts and the final part the grand finale. Copying Lydia Thompson’s lead, most of the troupes had female managers. However towards the end of the nineteenth century, as male managers took over, they switched the emphasis away from comedy to push boundaries, determined to show as much uncovered female flesh as the laws would allow.

This form of entertainment metamorphosed in the early twentieth century into a mix of music hall, satire and striptease. During the twenties the bias continued inexorably towards striptease and away from the accompanying elements. This shift doubtlessly was burlesque’s downfall; by the thirties the popularity of burlesque dropped away probably reacting against what had become slightly tawdry striptease shows. Local authorities were no longer as tolerant of this entertainment, which had lost much of its music hall variety flavor.

New Burlesque

In the mid nineteen nineties the genre was resurrected, with troupes in the USA, and the trend has snowballed over to the UK. Now, once more on both sides of the channel, it is possible to see shows equal in glamour, bawdiness and variety to equal the art form in its heyday in clubs and theatres in major cities. Arguably the Internet has played a major part to spread the interest in the genre. There are websites, such as Ministry of Burlesque dedicated to promoting it, to teaching dance, makeup and fashion.

Burlesque lingerie fashion

The mainstay of this style is lingerie and modern burlesque generally concentrates on the fifties and to a lesser degree the forties look. This extends not only to clothing, but hats, footwear and makeup too. There have always been fans of fifties silk and nylon stockings. The majority stocking mills closed up shop when pantyhose all but killed the stocking market. Their huge stocking machines were destroyed and along with it the expertise to manufacture fully-fashioned stockings. Now the rare machines remaining are being rebuilt and returned to service to again produce faux fifties seamed stockings. However a few companies trading online still have limited supplies of the original fifties stockings so the purists can satisfy their need to the ‘real thing’ rather than the modern copies. Sadly, once that depleting stock is exhausted, they will only be viewable in museums and private collections.

However, for burlesque stage performance it is the fishnet tights or pantyhose that are still really popular.

Companies are making exact copies both of retro costumes and burlesque accessories, from ostrich feather fans to bullet bras. Lingerie companies, sensing an opportunity not to be missed, are enticing well-known burlesque artists to lend their names and expertise to burlesque-inspired lingerie designs.

Burlesque is eagerly embraced by all physiques, from plus size to skinny-minny, proving how empowering it can be to women – all physiques are equally welcomed, but there is not set ‘burlesque costume’ either. It is very common for burlesque artists to take everyday lingerie, adapt it by sewing on sequins to devise their own unique take on burlesque. However the common thread that runs through the new outfits, going right back to the earliest days of the art form is the element of ‘tease’, the showing of rather more lingerie and stocking tops that would normally be seen in everyday life.

Rockabilly fashion

Over the years a number of fashion styles have grown towards each other, oft times overlapping. The word rockabilly was used around the mid forties and was a blend of hillbilly and rock and roll music styles. Todays pinup photographers generally recreate the stylish fifties imagery which overlaps but is distinct from rockabilly. Many rockabilly enthusiasts have tattoos and piercings, and that certainly was never a fad of the fifties, but a modern phenomenon.

Pinup fashion

The term pinup also has blurred origins, covering photos of movie stars from around the thirties and forties, but also the airbrushed fantasy women gracing men’s magazines by such exponents as Petty and Elvgren. The fashions often featured nylons and lingerie, sometimes being exposed by a sudden unexpected gust of wind or other ‘mishap’ that befell the model. The intention was actually to reveal very very little by today’s standards. It is a certainty that pinup art, with the sexy lingerie has strongly influenced the outfits adopted by many of today’s burlesque artists.

The History Of Harem Pants

In the mind of the average westerner, the latest fashion trend known as harem pants might seem more like a throwback to those few years covering the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. Although we might reminisce with a smile the phrase “Hammer time!”, the history of harem pants runs much deeper than a simple vintage look from a not too distant period in fashion.

The current fashion trend known as harem pants can be traced back nearly 2,000 years to the traditional garments known as salvars worn in western and southwestern Asia. The pants are known there by many names depending on the region, and they are can be worn by both men and women. Some variations on the name for the style of pants are salwar, shalvar, or shalvaar.

In Persian, the word literally means pants, as it is the Persians who first developed pants as a form of garment. Unlike in the past when garments were intended to promote modesty, modern versions of the salvars worn by women feature slits on the sides up to the waistline with the waist area slung low over the hips – although this style is mostly reserved for parties and other social functions. Also in some modern cultures of western Asia, harem pants are known as Kurdish pants, and it is not uncommon for families to have these pants on hand as comfortable house clothing into which their guests may change when lounging.

In western culture, these baggy pants were introduced as a women’s article of clothing in the mid-1800’s, although at the time they soon came to be known as “bloomers” and “Turkish trousers”. These women’s pants were known as bloomers because of early women’s rights advocate Amelia Bloomer’s penchant for wearing the trousers and for the fact the style of trouser originates in western Asia. They were marketed as a form of women’s dress that would allow for an active lifestyle without compromising a woman’s decency, but they failed to catch on and were rejected by western society at large until their reintroduction again in the early 1900’s.

In 1909, harem pants were brought back into the fashion collective consciousness by French designer Paul Poiret, with the pants being worn below a tunic draped over the upper body. Unfortunately this trend failed as well, and harem pants were again relegated to being worn for women’s sports. Women and girls who participated in active sports and in physical education type settings wore pants resembling the modern harem pant, i.e. baggy short pants drawn together at the knees, up through the 1980’s. Women wore knee length undergarments known as bloomers or knickers throughout this same time period.

In more recent times and like the garments from which they take their inspiration, harem pants are a fashion trend that is not confined to just women or men. In the late 1980’s and early 1990’s, harem pants were again brought into the main stream by the quirky stylings of then hip-hop superstar MC Hammer. The style was worn by both men and women, and confined more to a younger consumer group.

As of 2009, harem pants are making a comeback. But unlike their late twentieth century forerunner, today’s harem pants are proving to be a fashion statement to be made by the sleek, sophisticated, and chic. Modern harem pants are a sort of cross between a short skirt and skinny jeans, and you get the benefits of both without any of the shortcomings. The legs are typically fitted at the knees with a loose, baggy crotch area made to look as if it were designed for a skirt. It might sound off the wall, but it makes for a great unconventional look with abundant possibilities for completing your look.

Bubble-Up Effects of Subculture Fashion

The notion that trends in fashion take part in a phenomenon known as the trickle down effect has long been recognised by fashion pundits. A process of social emulation of society’s upper echelons by the subordinates provides myriad incentives for perpetual and incessant changes in fashion through a sequence of novelty and imitation. Dior’s ‘New Look’ of 1947 consisted of creations that were only affordable to a minority of affluent women of the time. Fashion was governed by haute-couture designers and presented to the masses to aspire toward. However, this traditional prospective has been vigorously challenged by many throughout the fashion world. Revisionist observations have introduced a paradoxical argument that fashion trends have, on numerous occasions, inadvertently emerged from the more obscure spheres of society onto the glamorous catwalks of high-fashion designers.

These styles can originate from a range of unorthodox sources, from leather-jacketed punks and dramatic Goths, the teddy boys of the 1950s, to ethnic minority cultures from all edges of the globe. Styles that emerge from the bottom of the social hierarchy are increasingly bubbling up to become the status of high fashion. There has been significant concern over the implications of this so-called bubble-up effect, such as the ambiguity between the notions of flattering imitation and outright exploitation of subcultures and minority groups. Democratization and globalisation of fashion has contributed to the abrasion of the authenticity and original identity of street-style culture. The inadvertent massification of maverick ideas undermines the ‘street value’ of the fashions for the very people who originally created them.

The underlying definition of subculture, with regards to anthropology and sociology, is a group of people who differentiates from the larger prevailing culture surrounding them. Members of a subculture have their own shared values and conventions, tending to oppose mainstream culture, for example in fashion and music tastes. Gelder proposed several principal characteristics that subcultures portrayed in general: negative relations to work and class, association with their own territory, living in non-domestic habitats, profligate sense of stylistic exaggeration, and stubborn refusal of massification. Hebdige emphasised that the opposition by subcultures to conform to standard societal values has been slated as a negative trait, where in fact the misunderstood groups are only attempting to find their own identity and meaning. The divergence away from social normalcy has unsurprisingly proliferated new ideas and styles, and this can be distinctly observed through the existence of fashion diversity. Ethnicity, race, class and gender can be physical distinctions of subcultures. Furthermore, qualities which determine a subculture may be aesthetic, linguistic, sexual, political, religious, or a mixture of these factors.

Sigmund Freud and his nephew Edward Bernays investigated the drivers of social control and the engineering of consent. Their psychological theories provide insight into the causes of deviation, by members of a subculture, from social norms. They highlighted the irrationality of human beings and discovered that by tapping into their deepest desires, it is possible to manipulate unconscious minds in order to manage society. Freud believed that stimulating the unconscious was crucial to creating desire, and therefore is conducive to economic progress and mass democracy. Bernays argued that individual freedom was unattainable because it would be “too dangerous to allow human beings to truly express themselves”. Through various methods of advertising, a distinctive ‘majority’ can be created in society, where a person belonging to this group is perceived to be normal, conventional and conformist. By using techniques to satisfy people’s inner desires, the rise of widespread consumerism plays a part in the organized manipulation of the masses. However, through the unleashing of certain uncontrolled aggressive instincts, occasional irrationality emerged in groups, and this repudiation of the banalities of ordinary life is believed to be a key factor in the generation of subcultures.

The expansion of youth styles from subcultures into the fashion market is a real network or infrastructure of new kinds of commercial and economic institutions. The creation of new and startling styles will be inextricably linked to a process of production and publicity inevitably leading to the diffusion and spread of the subversive subculture trends. For example, both mod and punk innovations have become incorporated into high and mainstream fashion after the initial low-key emergence of such styles. The complexities of society perpetuate continuous change in style and taste, with different classes or groups prevailing during certain periods of time. To deal with the question of which is the most influential source of fashion, it is necessary to consider distribution of power. It is not the same for all classes to have access to the means by which ideas are disseminated in our society, principally the mass media. In history, the elites have had greater power to prescribe meaning and dictate what is to be defined as normality.

Trickling down to shape the views of the substantial passive parts of the population, designers from high places were able to set trends that diffused from the upper to lower spectrum of society. Subcultures, it was suggested, go against nature and are subject to abhorrence and disapproval by followers of mainstream trends. Regrettably, criminal gangs, homeless subcultures and reckless skateboarders, among other ‘negative’ portrayals of subcultures have been accused of dragging down the image of other ‘positive’ subcultures which demonstrate creativity and inspiration. There is an unstable relationship between socialising and de-socialising forces. Nevertheless, German philosopher Kant observed that actual social life should and always will consist of in some way its own opposite asocial life, which he described as “unsociable sociality”.

Without doubt, fashion exhibits a dichotomy of conformity and differentiation, with contradictory groups aspiring to fit in and stand out from a crowd. Previously, the pace of change that fashion went through has spawned social emulation, a phenomenon whereby subordinate groups follow a process of imitation of the fashion tastes adopted by the upper echelons of society. Veblen, a Norwegian-American sociologist and economist, criticized in detail the rise of consumerism, especially the notion of conspicuous consumption, initiated by people of high status. Another influential sociologist Georg Simmel, classified two basic human instincts – the impetus to imitate one’s neighbours, and conversely, the individualistic behaviour of distinguishing oneself.

Simmel indicated the tendency towards social equalization with the desire for individual differentiation and change. Indeed, to elucidate Simmel’s theory of distinction versus imitation, the distinctiveness of subcultures in the early stages of a set fashion assures for its destruction as the fashion spreads. An idea or a custom has its optimal innovative intensity when it is constrained to a small clandestine group. After the original symbolic value of the idea has been exploited by commercialisation and accepted as a part of mass culture, the balance will have a tendency to tip towards imitation over distinction. An example of the imitation of a distinctive subculture is the evolution of blue jeans, which originating from humble American cowboys and gold-miners, demonstrate a bubble-up effect of a subculture. On a larger scale, it can be said that Western style dressing ‘bubbled-up’ from 19th Century Quaker’s attire, rather than ‘trickling down’ from the styles of Court aristocracy.

Simmel describes fashion as a process by which the society consolidates itself by reintegrating what disrupts it. The existence of fashion requires that some members of society must be perceived as superior or inferior. From economist Harvey Leibenstein’s perspective, fashion is a market constituted of ‘snobs’. The phenomenon of ‘snob-demand’ depicts consumers as snobs who will stop buying a product when the price drops too much. The trickle down effect has been related to a ‘band-wagon effect’ where the turnovers of a product are particularly high as a result of imitation. Every economic choice is bound not only to the pure computational rationality of individuals, but is influenced by irrational factors, such social imitation, contrary to what Simmel calls the ‘need for distinction’. However, a ‘reverse bandwagon effect’ acts as an opposing force when a snobbish consumer stops buying a product because too many others are buying it as well. The resultant force depends on the relative intensity of the two forces.

Subcultures have often endured a less than agreeable relationship with the mainstream as a result of exploitation and cultural appropriation. This often leads to the demise or evolution of a particular subculture once the originally novel ideas have been commercially popularised to an extent where the ideologies of the subculture have lost their fundamental connotations. The insatiable commercial hunger for new trends instigated the counterfeiting of subculture fashion, unjustifiably used on the sophisticated catwalks in fashion dictatorships of Paris, Milan and New York. It is not purely sartorial fashion but also music subcultures that are particularly vulnerable to the massification process. Certain types of music like jazz, punk, hip hop and rave were only listened to by minority groups at the initial stages of its history.

Events in history have had substantial impacts on the rise, development and evolution of subcultures. The First World War had an impact on men’s hairstyles as lice and fleas were ubiquitous in wartime trenches. Those with shaved heads were presumed to have served at the Front while those with long hair were branded cowards, deserters, and pacifists. During the 1920s, standard social etiquettes were discarded by certain youth subcultures, as drink, drugs and jazz infiltrated America, intensified by the alcohol prohibition of the time. A crime subculture emerged as smugglers discovered profit opportunities with Mexican and Cuban drug plantations. The Great Depression of the late 20s in North America caused pervasive poverty and unemployment. Consequently, a significant number of adolescents discovered identity and expression through urban youth gangs, such as the ‘dead end kids’.

Existentialists like Camus and Sartre also played a significant part in influencing the subcultures of the 1950s and 60s. Emphasis on freedom of the individual created a version of existential bohemianism resembling the beat generation. This subculture represented a version of bohemian hedonism; McClure declares that “non-conformity and spontaneous creativity were crucial”. In literature, Steinbeck’s “The Grapes of Wrath” depicted the economic hardship of these times. Initially burned and banned to American citizens, condemned as communist propaganda, this book was given the Nobel Prize for literature in 1962. It only took a few decades for the previously socially unacceptable book to diffuse into mainstream culture.

The popularisation of folk and cowboy songs led to their unique underlying patterns being mixed with elements of jazz, blues and soul, creating a new subculture of western swing. Technological progress facilitated “instantaneous mass media creating large subcultures from the ideas of a range of smaller subcultures”. Accordingly, a bubble-up effect can be seen where, through a process of innovation and diffusion, original ideas can spread into mass culture.

The process of integration has a potential to lead to the polarisation of warring subcultures, contributing to social disorganization. Shaw and Mckay assessed that although their data is not sufficient to determine “the extent to which membership in delinquent gangs produces delinquency”, membership is probably a contributing factor. They use the term ‘differential social organisation’ to depict how subculture formation is a result of broader economic and demographic forces that undermine conventional local institutions of control.

The institution of the family is weakened by these forces, and as a result, alternatives to the traditional family have arisen as various subcultures. Ethan Watters elucidated this social trend in his book defining urban tribes as “groups of never-married’s between the ages of 25 and 45 who gather in common-interest groups and enjoy an urban lifestyle”. Analysis of the long term perspective of street trends reveal that youth trends bubble-up every five to ten years, and that individualism, anarchy and self-realization, are universal in these trends.

In the process of bubbling up, there are two important concepts to consider, that of ‘diffusion’ and ‘defusion’. Fashion diffusion focuses on the individual and the crowd, particularly in this case the spreading of fashion in a systematic way from small scale to large scale institutions. It highlights the idea that fashion innovation and creativity drawn from subcultures are integrated into mass culture. In the process, non-conformist fashion may be subject to defusion, a diluting of the fundamental intrinsic meaning of the original subculture. The commercialisation of fashion is especially central to the danger of decontextualisation of trend origins. For example, the wearing of ripped jeans, an accepted form of attire nowadays, does not necessarily relate to the image of ‘hippies’ in modern times. The concept of identity and its modifications and transformations after a period of time should be carefully considered.

Analysis of street style is another fundamental aspect in determining the extent of a bubble-up effect in fashion. It is an idea that opposes the view that high fashion has given way to popular culture. Polhemus proposed that “styles which start life on the street corner have a way of ending up on the backs of top models on the world’s most prestigious fashion catwalks”. Prior to this new train of thought, the predominant view was that new looks began with couture and ‘trickle down’ to the mass market mainline fashion industry. Polhemus suggested that the evidence he found gave insight to a chain of events; initially genuine street innovation appears, followed by the featuring in mass media, such as magazines or television programmes, of street kids. In time, the ritzy version of the original idea makes an appearance, as a part of a top designer’s collection.

Polhemus identified two basic street-styles involving dressing up or dressing down. Those from a relatively affluent sector of society, such as the Beatniks and Hippies developed a penchant for the latter, preferring to descend down the socio-economic ladder in the interest of authenticity. Nowadays, the variety of attire seen on streets and nightclubs show that culture is no longer only a prerogative of the upper class. Although, the creatively democratic society that we progress towards optimizes fashion innovation, cynics of the bubble-up effect, such as Johnny Stuart, condemned in his book on rockers, “the fancy fashionable versions of the Perfecto which you see all over the place, dilute the significance, taking away its original magic, castrating it”.

Social crises of the 1950s and 1970s brought about new ideological constructions in response to the worsening economy, scarcity of jobs, loss of community, and the failure of consumerism to satisfy real needs. Racism became a solution to the problems of working-class life. Such periods of social turmoil resulted in fashion defusion, with many subcultures becoming increasingly detached from their foundation symbolisms. The connotations of the attire of the teddy boys during the 1970s bore little resemblance to the style of 1956. The original narcissistic upper-class style was somewhat irrevocably lost in a wave of ‘second generation teds’ that preferred fidelity to the classic ‘bad-boy’ stereotypes. The concept of specificity, subcultures responding to circumstances at distinctive moments in history, is depicted as vital to the study of subcultures.

Therefore the resultant mass-consumed item may draw distance from the emblem of the original subculture, attainable to all who can afford it. The loss of identity may prove to be a serious problem as subcultures may feel exploited, estranged and meaningless without a sense of belonging. Subcultures established a sense of community to certain individuals during a new post-war age that witnessed the deterioration of traditional social groupings. Polhemus claims that subcultures like Teddy Boys, Mods, Rockers, Skinheads, Rockabillies, Hipsters, Surfers, Hippies, Rastafarians, Headbangers, Goths, etc, as “social phenomenon style tribes cannot be dismissed as something transitory”. Known as the Kogal phenomenon, a subculture emerged where groups of young girls between the ages of 15 and 18 appeared on the streets of Tokyo with long dyed-brown or bleached-blond hair, tanned skin, heavy makeup, brightly coloured miniskirts or short pants that flare out at the bottom, and high platform boots.

‘Field’ has become more appropriate in the analysis of fashion changes. People engaged in similar lifestyles with intrinsically similar cultural capital, i.e. nationality, profession, family and friends form group identities interacting with others in the same ‘field’. This has been an important contributing factor to the birth of subcultures.The anachronistic belief that class was a determinant of fashion has reduced significantly, as confirmed by Bauman, who proposed the idea of ‘liquid society’, where fashion exists in a more flexible and malleable state.

A particular phenomenon of recent times, subject to both a trickle-down and a bubble-up effect of varying degrees, is the democratization and globalization of fashion. There has been an emergence of ‘prêt-a-porter’ invented by John Claude Weill in 1949. This development has increased the speed and diffusion of fashion trends across the world, which amplified the culture of fast fashion, massification and global standardisation. Standardised factory-made prêt-a-porter clothes, of which ‘wearability’ is crucial, sometimes descend from places of high fashion, for example inspired from couture. Designers such as Poiret, Dior and Lacroix produce a ready-to-wear line alongside their haute couture collection to take advantage of a wider market. Nevertheless, its mass-produced industrial nature detracts away from the exclusivity of traditional couture.

By 1930, couturiers like Schiaparelli, Delauney, and Patou began to design their own ready-to-wear boutiques, understanding the new emerging system of fashion whereby the moment that people stop copying you, it means that you are no longer any good. The democratization of couture disallowed it to sustain its elitist nature and therefore haute couture was beginning to accept that fashion was about emulation. Nevertheless, attire was not entirely uniform and equalised. Subtle nuances continued to mark social distinctions but mitigated the upper class penchant for conspicuous consumption.

Democratising fashion came hand in hand with a ‘disunification’ of feminine attire, which varied more in form and became less homogeneous. The fundamental attraction of making profit inspired innovation in styles and a perpetual search for lower costs through efficient industrial manufacturing. Institutions were evolving to an extent that the pretentious elitist sectors diminished in favour of universal mass production. The end of the Second World War brought about increased demand for fashion, encouraged by films and magazines of the time and the take off of global advertising campaigns, i.e. Levi’s, Rodier, Benetton, Naf-Naf, etc, highlighting the need for high standards of living, well-being and hedonistic mass culture. It is the globalisation and rapidity of fashion movements, as Kawamura amply discussed, that underline the fact that “fast-changing tastes of consumers are matched only by the cleverness of the department store that identifies trendsetters among young consumers and feeds their knowledge into the production cycle”.

It is impossible to conduct discourse in fashion without associating it with change, unpredictability and a high degree of uncertainty. It is very difficult to distinguish which goods will be adorned by the mass population and which trends will be instantaneously rejected. In general, industries need economic capital and political solidarity to function but these institutions are particularly difficult to uphold in the aesthetic industry. A paradox exists in that while on a superficial level everyone associates fashion with change, the underlying forces value stability. They argue that it is not possible to speak of one single fashion, but rather of different fashions existing at the same time. This is especially the case for an intrinsically fast-paced, competitive and fragmented industry. A bubble-up effect is inherent to a globalised fashion world, and the upward flow of fashion stemming from various subcultures contributes abundantly to this process.

Finding Fashion Jewelry

Fashion jewelry is a necessary part of your wardrobe. While fine jewelry can be an expensive investment, fashionable jewelry is a more affordable way to have fun with accessories. It allows you to experiment with fashion trends and new styles without breaking the bank. Because it is so affordable, it is easier to part with when a trend is over or the piece doesn’t fit your style anymore. You may regret a trendy finer purchase, so it is best to invest in quality fine jewelry while having fun with less expensive fashionable find. Finding great jewelry has become easier over time, with many high-end fashion designers developing lines of fashionable jewelry for various department and discount stores.

In finer department stores, many fashion designers have done lines of fashion jewelry. Ralph Lauren, Givenchy, Betsey Johnson, and Rachel Roy are all examples of fashion lines available. The pieces are usually under $100, with many being under $50. Some of the selection is more trend-focused, such as turquoise and coral jewelry for summer. Finding a particular style of a certain piece is easy because many lines will offer their own variations of the trend.

More classic fashionable jewelry is also available. Pearls, rhinestones, and semi-precious stones are also featured in many fashion lines. The jewelry is a more affordable version of fine jewelry pieces, and many look identical to its “real” counterparts. This kind of fashion jewelry surpasses trends and is great for traveling when you don’t want to bring along a lot of valuables.

In discount retail stores there are also a lot of collaborations with fashion designers. Vera Wang, Dana Buchman, and Anna Sheffield have all created lines of jewelry at affordable prices. The pieces coordinate with the clothing lines that the designers have also created for the stores, so creating a complete look is easier than ever. These discount stores even have their own lines that are more trend-driven. Many of these pieces are also available online.

Update an older, plain outfit with trendy pieces for a look that is more up to date. Designer boutiques may also offer fashionable jewelry. Many upscale designers will have fun, affordable pieces available only in their stores. It may be intimidating to walk in to a high-end boutique, but you may just find the perfect piece of fashion jewelry.

Korean Fashion, a new trendsetter

Staying fashionably smart is the mantra for today’s world. So coming to fashion the very first thing strikes to our mind is clothes, which are a very important aspect of one’s personality. They can enhance or reduce the effect of your personality on someone. The dress you choose always defines or reflects your taste, class and various other facts which may not be highlighted by any other way. Therefore, one should always make sure to buy quality clothes and put them on in a very fashionable manner so that they always act in favor of you.

As we know very well that there are various types of clothes are now available in the Korean stores like the hip hop wear, street wear, urban wear and etc, which are especially designed to suit the needs of the individuals and make sure that they coordinate well with their style and charm. Currently, one of the most popular fashions clothing is ‘Korean Fashion’. This Korean fashion has now become a new trendsetter around the globe. They are not only very much in demand but also flooding the international markets over the world. The Korean clothing fashion arena is leading a new name that creating a roar of success in the fashion world both in the east and the west.

Well when it comes to Korean fashion, the clothes are specially designed keeping in mind not only the young generation but also the middle aged Korean women who are working individuals and also homemakers as well. According to peoples demand the Korean fashion designers stitch dresses that are compatible for both work and home so that the women feel comfortable and sassy about their bodies at the same time.

It is therefore Korean fashion industry is stuffed with wonderful clothes and designs, which are especially designed to win the admiration of those consumers who are looking for something Asian in nature and material, and western and chic in style. These clothes are made from stupendous quality raw material that is designed especially for this purpose so that even the foreign clients who are interested in true essence of Korean fashion can enjoy the feel.

However Korean fashion is all about staying unique and confidence because it accentuates important aspect of a women’s body. It not only focuses to elongate height, emphasizes the small waistline but also creates an illusion for a more slender physique. Lastly, Korean fashion can provide with all these added trendy styles and colour patterns while looking chic. It is easy to bring attentions when you incorporate Korean fashion into your existing style. So if you truly want to experiment with your looks then there is no better option than Korean clothing fashion because it adds to your beauty and looks formal and trendy in an outfit.

The Advantage Of Buying And Wearing Fashion Jewelry

The times are really getting harder and harsher. Because there is a pending and apparent economic crunch anywhere in the world, it is easy to realize that the number of robbers and thieves is really rising. But because there is a constant need to be fashionable, there is a need to wear jewelry, especially for the fashionably conscious people. But how secure and safe could you be when you decide to wear jewelries during important occasions? Do not fret. There surely is a fashion jewelry that would suit your taste.

What is fashion jewelry? Those who are not familiar with the word would readily assume that fashion jewelry is a piece of fashionable jewelry. Yes, it is true. Fashion jewelry entails fashion and beauty. But more than that, fashion jewelry is a piece of accessory that has less actual valuation that it really looks like. In other words, the words may be harsh, fashion jewelries are fake jewelries.

When you say fake, that means the materials by which every fashion jewelry is made up is fake or is not really expensive. For example, a gold necklace would not really be a gold necklace if it is a fashion jewelry. In such case, the gold in the necklace is not really gold but a material that is tarnished or colored to make it appear like it is actually and genuinely gold.

Buying fashion jewelry

There is a market for fashion jewelry. That is because as long as there are budget conscious people, as long as there are wise and fashionable consumers, there would always be buyers of fake jewelries. As long as there are fashionable and extravagant people who could not really afford expensive and premium priced jewelries, there would always be demand for fashion jewelry.

If you are aiming to buy a set of jewelries to suit you get up for an important occasion, why not consider buying fashion jewelry? Nowadays, people would not really care if somebody is wearing fashion jewelry. As long as the wearer could carry the items in fashion and he or she looks good and elegant on them, there would be no questions asked.

Buying fashion jewelry is also made easier nowadays. To make a purchase, all you have to do is to go the nearest and reliable jewelry store. You could easily spot a section of displays for fashion jewelry. Notice that modern fashion jewelries are exquisitely beautiful and gorgeous.

Online purchases of fashion jewelry is also made more feasible and convenient. To do so, all you have to do is to log on to the Website of an online jewelry store or online auctioneer or shopping store. Find and look for fashion jewelry brochures and presto, choose the design and styles you want. Consider the overall get up and design of the clothes you would wear before finally ordering and buying the appropriate fashion jewelry for you.

The advantage of wearing fashion jewelry

The first and primary advantage of wearing fashion jewelry is its relative low cost. Yes, because fashion jewelries are fake jewelries, it is expected and logical that the tag prices are not as significant and as expensive as the premium and genuine expensive jewelries. For example a gold fashion jewelry would naturally cost significantly cheaper than the actual market cost for real gold jewelry.

However, despite the big difference in pricing, it would be amazing that fashion jewelries are still looking as elegant, as gorgeous and as breath-taking as any other expensive jewelries in the market today. The dangling appeal and the fancy reception of bystanders and admirers to fashion jewelry is at the same magnitude as the adoration provided and paid to real and genuine expensive jewelries.

Another advantage of wearing fashion jewelry is that you would have a sense of safety and security. If ever you would be robbed while wearing the jewelry, you could be sure that you are not standing to lose a significant amount of money or asset. Fashion jewelries are cheap so you could easily buy hundreds of them anytime you desire. And you could easily dispose them if they already not usable.

Burglars and thieves certainly would not like it if people would heavily patronize fashion jewelry. That means that the robbers’ efforts to steal and forcefully take a precious jewelry would be futile if they would be robbing fashion jewelry.

Fashion & Art a Potent Potion!

By Beverly Pereira Photography: Courtesy Tarun Tahiliani & The Singh Twins

Tarun Tahiliani’s Spring Summer 15 collection showcased at the Lakme Fashion Week Summer Resort 2015 features motifs, imagery and colours inspired by the celebrated art of the British-Indian Singh Twins…

Fashion and Art are not exactly strange bedfellows. Think Andy Warhol’s portrait of Yves Saint Lauren or Warhol’s iconic flowers that played muse to Prada’s Spring 2013 collection. More recently and closer to home, Tarun Tahiliani has collaborated with the internationally acclaimed Singh Twins, whose works of art play muse to his Lakme Fashion Week Spring Summer -15 collection.

The London-born, Liverpool-based Singh Twins, Amrit and Rabindra, describe their work as -past modern’ as opposed to Post Modern, portraying their Indian and British identities through the application of eastern and western aesthetics. Using motifs that represent British Asian life, cityscapes and pop culture, their work is tinged with the personal and the political and can be viewed as a social commentary with tongue-in-cheek humour.

Hugely inspired by this melange, the designer launched a ready-to-wear fashion line at the Wills India Fashion 2014 in Delhi as an ode to the Singh Twins’ art. He has now crafted garments for the Mumbai Lakme Fashion Week that bring to life the Twins’ well-received Indian miniature paintings, detailed black and white drawings and digital mixed medium art that explores an exclusive relationship with their home city of Liverpool.

Tarun, himself, is known to skilfully blend the modern and the traditional and augmenting this with the Twins’ affinity for reviving the age-old technique of miniature painting and the juxtaposition of modern iconography has led to a range of digitally printed separates – kaftans, jewel tees, dhoti skirts, lungi skirts, leggings and dresses etc. Some colour palettes and elements have been creatively reworked by the designer to harmonise with the collection. The twins’ Wheel of Fortune has been incorporated as a whole on to a Tahiliani kurta, while decorative motifs from their black and white Aquarius have been reassembled and colourised within the design of another outfit. Silk kaftans, much like a vast canvas, allow the twins’ paintings to come through beautifully. Saris are rife with colours, featuring borders that carry Persian motifs borrowed from their paintings.

His menswear also features text vignettes, stylised clouds and waves, borders and decorative motifs from several of the twins’ works, offering fashion lovers an artistic take-away, proving yet again that the art and fashion are strong counter-influencers! click here to view images from the collection on indiaartndesign.com